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Data Update – May 2018


Data publication from TERN repositories continues to grow and so too do the number of researchers utilising these great open-access resources and services.
 

This month we feature vegetation decomposition data collected at TERN’s nation-wide network of ecosystem process monitoring SuperSites as part of the global Tea Bag Index (TBI) project.

The TBI project links with the ILTER TeaComposition project to collect data on rates of carbon decomposition in ecosystems around the globe. Burying tea bags and measuring their decomposition over time is a simple and effective way of determining the decomposition rates of litter carbon in a particular ecosystem.  For example, researchers using the TBI and its data have been able to demonstrate the potential for such tea-bag studies to be used to identify sites that may operate as strong terrestrial and coastal carbon sinks. Collecting decomposition data across continents will help scientists make global predictions on the release of carbon under climate change scenarios.

Decomposition data are now openly available from five of TERN’s 12 SuperSites, including Great Western Woodlands in WA, Robson Creek Rainforest in QLD, Cumberland Plain and Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt in NSW, and Warra Tall Eucalypt in Tasmania. Data from the Daintree Rainforest and Samford Peri-urban TERN affiliate SuperSites are also available.

Further deployments of the TBI protocol across TERN's SuperSites will extend the range of environments tested and look at seasonal variation in decomposition rates. Data on these experiments will be made openly available as the experiments are completed.

 

Data collection name & description

Licensing*

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2016


Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2016

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2017


Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2017

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2017


Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2017

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2017


Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2017

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2016


Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2016

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2017


Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2017

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2017

Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.

Temporal coverage: 2017

 

Tea bags have been planted at most of TERN’s environmental monitoring SuperSites, including Great Western Woodlands in WA (left and middle), and FNQ Rainforest (right) (images courtesy Georg Whiehl and Mirko Karan).

 

 

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Published in TERN newsletter May 2018

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